Fibromyalgia and the roller coaster of emotions

” You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face”, Eleanor Roosevelt

In my view fibromyalgia is precipitated by the emotions of anxiety/fear which began perhaps in utero, but more likely early in life in which a child develops a hyper-aroused nervous system. Traumatic episodes experienced in a highly sensitive person is a fertile place for fibromyalgia roots to take hold. Generally  this dis-ease (not disease) begins to show its ugly face early in midlife. As a youngster this child is often said to be ‘highly strung’ or ‘too sensitive’ or ‘too fearful’. One woman I interviewed said she was likened to a ‘hot house orchid’, fragile and overly empathetic. I have yet to hear any of the hundreds of people I have either spoken with or read about who did not say somewhat the same about themselves. Tuned in to the world in a hyper-vigilant, overly caring way, the parts of the brain which can distinguish between that which is safe, or conversely fearful in our environment, is in a state of disarray. Anxiety predominates the personality of the fibromyalgia person.

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Fibromyalgia: Living with Chronic Pain

“In three words I can sum up everything I’ve learned about life: it goes on”, Robert Frost

I have frequently cited the works of adiemusfree from her HealthSkills Blog. She has become my guru for updates on research regarding pain. I take hope because of her personal struggles with the issues surrounding living  with acceptance in lieu of catastrophising. Daily pain is exhausting, depletes our energy, leaves us with a sense of hopelessness. Each new symptom (and there are many) can be like taking one step forward and two backward. How do we continue? As she says in her October 18/15 blog: “After all, life doesn’t stop just because pain is a daily companion”. The same could be said of the other myriad of symptoms we experience.

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Fibromyalgia and over-exercising: no focused attention

“Besides focused attention, other factors that enhance neuroplasticity include aerobic exercise, novelty and emotional arousal”, Daniel J. Siegal

I have been absent from writing on his site for over two months because I did not practice what I preach. While I have been an advocate of neuroplasticity, that is, the power to change our brains, I have not heeded that which I know to be an approach that is safe for those of us with fibromyalgia. In fact, aerobic exercise, novelty and emotional arousal are the three key ingredients of a health lifestyle for those of us with chronic pain. Focused attention is therefore paramount for us; we need to be constantly in touch with the changing circuits of the mind. Mindfulness meditation is one of the key links to focussed attention,  to living in the moment. But, it is the combination of the four elements cited above that present a balance for those of us with the overstimulated nervous system that challenges us daily.

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