Fibromyalgia After Hip Surgery: A slow process

” Patience is a conquering virtue”, Geoffrey Chaucer

So, the hip replacement happened almost three weeks ago. I had hoped that when I took my first step post operatively I would not have pain. So many people told me that would  happen. I should have known better. Of course there is still pain. It is too soon for me to know the nature of it. Is it fibromyalgia? The scar? The hip itself? I thought I was the expert of my own body but it has now had an assault of a different nature. I believe I will have a handle on it in a few more weeks. For now, I am trying to live every day in a slower manner. At first I rushed through walking, stopped using the walker too soon and developed shin splints. It is my misfortune I am not patient and calm. I have learned even more about this highly motivated personality of mine. Are all of us with fibromyalgia this energetic type who suffers because we rush through life?

It is a beautiful summer day with a slight breeze. Time to heal.

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I will write more in a few weeks, for now, breathe and slow down…

 

6 comments

  1. Brigitte Hahnemann says:

    Dear Barbara,
    I can understand what it feels like to undergo an operation and find out that things haven`t really changed to the better.
    Whether it`s Fibromyalgia, the fresh scar, the hip itself –
    you seem to have given your own answer (at least a part of it) : Rushing, especially through a healing period won`t be of great help (; That`s what comes to my mind, being just that sort of energetic and highly motivated type myself. Easy to tell others, more diffcult to live it, I admit.
    Sitting here with my right hip aching quite badly ( without operation) I keep my fingers crossed for you and wish you all the best for recovery and as much patience as it takes. Love and compassion from Biggi

  2. Barbara Keddy
    Barbara Keddy says:

    Dear Biggi: Thanks for your words of encouragement. I am trying very hard to slow down and practice patience. It isn’t easy! Do you also need a hip replacement? I hope you are having a good summer and that you aren’t experiencing much rain and dampness as we are here in Nova Scotia!
    Regards,
    Barbara

  3. Ellen says:

    Sorry to hear you’re having a tough period Barbara. Take care of yourself (which I’m sure you are doing!) and be kind and forgiving to yourself.
    Ellen

  4. Barbara Keddy
    Barbara Keddy says:

    Thanks Ellen: Each day gets a little better. The body takes on another scar and the neural pathway in the brain remembers. Now to soothe it and tell it there isn’t any danger. We accumulate so many physical and emotional scars and those of us with fibromyalgia find it difficult to let go of the trauma.
    But, I am improving!
    Barbara

  5. Marishka says:

    So glad to hear you are improving, Barbara, despite the pain and discouragement. I am hoping you will be over the hump and glad you took the chance for better functioning soon. A friend of mine almost gave up hope after her knee work, but finally got to the place where she thinks it was worth iit. May the same happen for you! It takes courage for you to share all this, so thank you for that, also…You’ll never know, if you don’t write, that readers care about you, or that some are in the same situation.

  6. Barbara Keddy
    Barbara Keddy says:

    Thank you so much Marishka!
    I am indeed improving and finding it an interesting, if tedious, process. People ask me if the pain in the hip is now gone and I really don’t know how to answer them. Having lived with pain for 50 years I am so used to various kinds that differentiating one type from another is not easy. This is why we often attribute all pain as that of fibromyalgia when in fact it can be from something else. Our fibro muscles are generally weakened because of misuse or lack of use so that pain shifts easily from one area to another. The good news for me is that the surgeon said I have very hard bones :”the bones of a 30 year old”, so I can tell it isn’t bone but rather muscles and nerve pain. My brain can’t tell one type of pain from another, although there are many descriptors such as stabbing, shock-like, dull, aching. At the surgery site it is now a dull ache so that is good news.
    After all this long diatribe about my symptoms I do know that I am getting stronger each day and will soon not need a cane! That’s the most positive and hearing from such kind people as you helps the healing process.
    Kind regards,
    Barbara

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