Monthly Archives: August 2015

Fibromyalgia: Strategies to Change the Brain

“One should sympathise with the colour , the beauty, the joy of life” , Oscar Wilde

Changing the neural pathways in the brain from ruminating about pain or various other symptoms of fibromyalgia can be achieved through various ways. I have tried two of the ‘hobbies’ that have helped me somewhat. One was sewing, (something I had never done before) by making quilts, mostly by hand! It was a difficult endeavour and costly! My hands would ache but the thrill of organizing colours and stitching them together brought me many hours of joy

The colours are what intrigued me and I searched diligently for bright fabric. I ended up making about 25 of them!

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Fibromyalgia and Brain Fog: Stop, Breathe & Think

“My own brain is to me the most unaccountable of machinery-always buzzing, humming, soaring roaring diving, and then buried in mud”, Virginia Woolf

To live a life in a state of high anxiety, boarding on panic, is common among those of us with fibromyalgia. We anticipate pain, fatigue, muddled thoughts, and a myriad of other symptoms almost every waking (and sleeping!) hour. It has become a habit that often seems unable to be broken and depression and fear set in. Often accompanying this is the brain fog, the confusion that often does not allow us to focus or to think clearly. Some describe the sensation as “fuzzy brain”, “spaced out”, “dreamy”,  “brain farts” or just plain forgetfulness.Whatever the label those of us with the condition know it is often accelerated by over stimulation, lack of sleep, pain, stress and anxiety. The new medical term is now “dyscognition“.  It would seem that the brain has difficulty in responding to stimuli because of a hyper-aroused central nervous system, a phrase I keep repeating over and over again in my many blogs. These habits of the brain are strong and require discipline that is challenging to break free from since they have accumulated over many years. Stress and all that it encompasses is, in my view, a main culprit.

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